IWD 2020: Olivia Hargroder, Bursary Recipient

To mark 2020 International Women’s Day (#EachforEqual), NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in and around the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Olivia Hargroder shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month. 

1. What were the benefits to you in being a 2019 NCWQ bursary recipient?

The NCWQ bursary has enabled me to continue with my acting studies. I have now completed a Cert IV in acting for stage and screen and have just started a NIDA Open course in Screen Acting. I was lucky enough to win an award at the 2019 Qld One Act Play Festival for my role in ‘I Hate Hedda’.

2. What are your goals for this year?

My goal this year is to put together some great takes for a showreel, launch my own website and audition for upcoming roles in film. Inclusive filming is really taking off and it is no longer acceptable to have characters with disabilities played by able bodied actors. Diversity is the new black and inclusive filmmakers will need diverse actors who are fully trained and ready to work in the industry. I’m ready.!!

3. What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations? 

I always say ‘Olivia, believe in yourself, work hard and then work even harder and your dreams will come true’.

I also say: ‘Always have a Plan B as sometimes things happen in a different way- never give up’.

4. Who have been your most significant female role models?

My female role models are Dame Quentin Bryce, Dani Harmer and Jessica Mauboy.

IWD 2020: Beth Madsen, Bursary Recipient

To mark 2020 International Women’s Day (#EachforEqual), NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in and around the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Beth Madsen shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month. 

1. What were the benefits to you in being a 2019 NCWQ bursary recipient?

The bursary allowed me to purchase a new computer, improving my ability to complete my study. The bursary also helped contribute to fees to attend a conference, further helping clarify my research intentions. 

2. What are your goals for this year?

In 2020, I am aiming to present my findings at 2 conferences, and continue with my research. 

3. What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

I set myself small, attainable goals for each day, each week and each month. This keeps me accountable and motivated. 

4. Who have been your most significant female role models?

My Mum and Dr Anita Heiss!

IWD 2020: Morgan Lynch, Bursary Recipient

To mark 2020 International Women’s Day (#EachforEqual), NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in and around the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Morgan Lynch shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month. 

1. What were the benefits to you in being a 2019 NCWQ bursary recipient?

While I am of course appreciative of the financial support I received as the 2019 recipient of the NCWQ Lady Justice Bursary, as this has helped ease the financial strain of pursuing a double degree in law and economics, I am perhaps most grateful for the opportunity the NCWQ has given me to meet many highly accomplished women.  The members of the NCWQ, including, of course, my fellow  2019 NCWQ bursary recipients, come from vastly different backgrounds and have equally diverse career aspirations.  However, they are united in their overwhelming sense of compassion for others and unwavering determination to succeed in their chosen fields.  These are qualities I find immensely inspiring and hope to emulate as I complete my university studies and enter the workforce.

2. What are your goals for this year?

At the end of last year, I was elected to the 2020 executive committee of QUT Women in Law (QUTWIL).  In my role as Industry Engagement Officer, my goal is to create meaningful opportunities for QUTWIL members to engage with the legal profession at networking and panel events.

3. What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

I am a big fan of the ‘“five by five” rule: If it doesn’t matter in five years, don’t spend more than five minutes being upset by it.  This rule helps give me the perspective I need to refocus my energy on pursuing my long-term goals, rather than spending time dwelling on the minor stumbling blocks I encounter along the way.

4. Who have been your most significant female role models?

On a personal level (and I realise this is going to sound extremely cliche), my biggest role model is my mother.  I hope one day to demonstrate her level of empathy, insight and, above all else, resilience.  My greatest professional role model, however, is US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  Throughout her six-decade-long legal career, she has not only pursued academic and professional excellence, rising to occupy one of the highest judicial offices in the United States, but has used her time and skills to fight for causes she is passionate about including gender equality.

I have also attached the QUT Women in Law sponsorship prospectus to this email.  QUTWIL was founded at the start of 2019 and, in our first year on campus, we have quickly garnered a reputation for promoting a culture of diversity and inclusivity within the QUT community and its next cohort of legal graduates. As a result, our membership base has grown to encompass an engaged community of over 200 talented and high-achieving law students. By way of example, QUTWIL’s founding executive team of nine students included a QUT Law Medalist, 2020 Supreme Court and District Court Judges Associates, future graduates at Australia’s top-tier firms, champion mooters, Student Guild representatives and women dedicated to local and global social justice initiatives. 

IWD 2020: Leah Zandonadi, Bursary Recipient

To mark 2020 International Women’s Day (#EachforEqual), NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in and around the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Leah Zandonadi shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month. 

  1. What were the benefits to you in being a 2019 NCWQ bursary recipient?

I was fortunate to be the recipient of the Quota International Centenary Bursary for Speech Pathology. This bursary has assisted me financially for travel and accommodation costs that are associated with my final year university placements.

2. What are your goals for this year?

My main goal for this year is to graduate university with a Bachelor of Speech Pathology! Within that big goal, one of my smaller goals is to be more confident as a clinician. I have set myself up well with the theory components of the course, but this final stretch is about putting that knowledge into practice. A goal for my personal life is to spend more time outdoors and with friends. I lost the work-life balance a bit last year unfortunately, but my housemates here on placement have kept me busy after work each day and on weekends by taking me to the hidden gems around the region I’m in. It’s something I definitely want to keep up when I am back from placement and can see my friends at home again!

3. What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

My personal mantra is “don’t fake it until you make it; know so you can grow.” At this point in my life I would say that I am academically driven, so a lot of what I do is to help me in that aspect. It for sure hasn’t been an easy road to get to where I am, but this quote keeps me on track and reminds me that I will benefit from putting in the hard yards over the duration of this degree because I want to be the best speech pathologist I can be.

4. Who have been your most significant female role models?

This is a hard one! I would have to say that everyone that has been involved in my tertiary education has influenced me one way or another, in my current life and my future. More than 95% of speech pathologists in Australia are female, so there’s so many women to look up to! I have been taught by the same female lecturers (who are all qualified speech pathologists) since my first year of study, meaning they have been there every step of the way to support and mentor me. I love hearing their stories about their experiences in the workforce, because I hope to have those same big life-changing impacts on my clients in the future. My clinical educators and supervisors on external placements are always reminding me that they were once in my shoes. They have been incredible in helping me build confidence as a clinician and know that this is just the beginning of a great career. And of course, my mum is another significant female role model in my life for more reasons than I can list. 

IWD 2020: Jess Honan, Bursary Recipient

To mark 2020 International Women’s Day (#EachforEqual), NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in and around the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Jess Honan shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month. 

What were the benefits to you in being a 2019 NCWQ bursary recipient? 
In 2017, I went to Germany as a Rotary Youth Exchange student and lived with a family in Duisburg. Thanks to the bursary, I could finally afford to go back to Germany and see my host family again. Not only was this a great opportunity to revive my German language skills, but it also meant a lot to me to be able to spend Christmas with my second family, after not having seen them in two years. 


What are your goals for this year

Going into my third year of arts/law degrees, my main focus for 2020 remains to stay as engaged with international humanitarian law as possible, and work towards my 5-languages-by-25 dream. Specifically though, I want to do more advocacy work when it comes to rural Australia and its role in Australia’s foreign policy agenda.


 What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

I have a little sheet of paper on the top of my laptop that says ‘w.w.h.d.?’ – what would Hermione do? Having grown up with the Harry Potter series, I always aspired to be exactly like Hermione Granger. Reminding me to be more like Hermione always pushes me to put in the extra hours when I just want to give up. I have always wanted to be as successful, smart and strong as Hermione, and this little sheet reminds me that if I continue to work hard, I can be.

Who have been your most significant female role models?

As a Harry Potter fanatic from a very young age, I have always wanted to be Hermione Granger. Aside from being one of very few unashamedly intelligent female figures in children’s stories as I was growing up, I also appreciate how dynamic a character Hermione is. She might be powerful, wickedly clever and vivaciously ambitious, but is also very down-to-earth, sensitive and stubborn. To me, this personified Hermione – she was more than a literary character, but a real human with human characteristics that I could endeavour to emmulate.