Women’s Leadership Development

END OF FINANCIAL YEAR FUNDING AVAILABLE: WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
Women & Leadership Australia is administering a national initiative to support the development of female leaders throughout Queensland.

The initiative is providing women with grants of between $3,000 and $8,000 to enable participation in a range of leadership development programs.  The scholarship funding is provided with the specific intent of providing powerful and effective development opportunities for all QLD women; however the funding is strictly limited and has to be allocated prior to the end of this financial year.

Expressions of Interest – find out more and register your interest by completing the Expression of Interest form here prior to 15th June: www.wla.edu.au/funding2

IWD 2018: Megan Collis, NCWQ Bursary Recipient

To mark 2018 International Women’s Day, NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in the lead up to and including around the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Megan Collis shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month or two.  

What were the benefits to you in being a 2017 NCWQ bursary recipient?

There was the monetary benefit, obviously, which allowed me to buy a new computer to replace my very old and outdated one, plus textbooks and a lot of very late night dinners coming home exhausted from long hours at uni.

The bursary was an extra achievement to put on my resume, and last year I was became employed at Queensland Health, working in the mental health units at Ipswich Hospital.

But there was also the validation that the new life I had been creating with my volunteer work and studies was valued. It was something tangible that I could look at on the hard days, when I wanted to give up, to remind me that, actually, I wasn’t a failure.

What are your goals for this year?

I was accepted into the Master of Counselling at USQ, so working my way through that is one of my big goals this year, and I have gotten the attention of the Master’s coordinator with my desire to get proactive counselling for people with chronic illnesses; this is the topic I would like to research for my thesis, if possible.

Both my personal experiences as a person with complex chronic illnesses, the experiences of friends who deal with chronic illness, and my volunteer work in the Stroke and Rehab ward at the hospital has convinced me that there is a great need to offer counselling to people in hospital, and at points of deterioration in their chronic diseases. At present there is limited psychological support on offer, with hospital psychologists and social workers overburdened, and medical staff too busy and not well trained in delivering emotional support to patients adjusting to new diagnoses. I believe counsellors could fill that gap and help both patients and clinicians understand each other’s perspectives better.

I am also getting more opportunities to be a health consumer representative, in various committees and focus groups, which I hope to build on through the year. I believe it is vital that health consumers have a voice in their healthcare.

Lastly, I hope to continue to be an ambassador for SMART Recovery Australia, the organisation that helped me overcome my addictive behaviours and instilled in me the belief that I was a person of worth and value. In an incredible twist of fate, the woman who trained me to become a facilitator for the organisation was also my nurse, when I was a child undergoing treatment for cancer. I fly to Sydney this week to be interviewed with her, for The Sydney Morning Herald’s weekly magazine article, ‘The Two of Us’.

 

What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

I have two:
1. Fall down seven times, get up eight.
2. One day at a time.

Who have been your most significant woman role models?

My role model is an unsung hero; her name is Sharon Majerovic. A psychologist with Drug ARM, she was also the facilitator of the SMART Recovery group I was once a member of (and now co-facilitate). When I entered my first SMART Recovery meeting I was broken, bitter and completely devoid of belief that life could ever be good; I was surviving, not living. It was her consistent calm kindness, respect, positivity and unwavering faith in me that finally led me to believe I could make positive changes and create a new life for myself that I could never have envisaged; it was her suggestion I consider a career in counselling. Although a promotion to Clinical Lead at Drug ARM has meant we no longer co-facilitate meetings together, and don’t see each other often, we are still in contact and she still provides guidance, both personally and professionally, when I need. I owe her everything.

IWD 2018: Christie Cordingly, NCWQ Bursary Recipient

To mark 2018 International Women’s Day, NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in the lead up to the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Christie Cordingly shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month or two.  

What were the benefits to you in being a 2017 NCWQ bursary recipient?

After receiving the 2017 NCWQ Bursary, I have been able to cut back on work hours and dedicate my time to my studies. I have been able to secure a new job in the education field which fits in perfectly with my study timetable. I have enjoyed a relaxing break over the Christmas period and I am looking forward to being able to focus my attention on my studies in my last year!

What are your goals for this year?

To work hard and improve my GPA at uni in my last year.

To graduate and hopefully secure a teaching job for 2019!

What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

If you work hard and do your best, you can do anything!​

Who have been your most significant woman role models?

My mum.

My teachers and mentor teachers throughout school and uni. ​

IWD 2018: Lucy Connolly, NCWQ Bursary Recipient

To mark 2018 International Women’s Day, NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in the lead up to the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Lucy Connolly shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month or two.  

What were the benefits to you in being a 2017 NCWQ bursary recipient?

Receiving the NCWQ Regional Bursary in 2017 gave me both financial security that enabled me to pursue my university degree and attend The Women’s College, whilst also provided me with several networking opportunities and allowed me to meet other likeminded women. On a personal note, being awarded this bursary validated my ambitions, and greatly boosted my self-esteem, as I now have a community of women who supported me.

What are your goals for this year?

In 2018, I plan to continue studying a Bachelor of Science (Biomedical) and Education (Secondary), with the intention of attempting the Gamsat medical entry exam. I will continue to live at The Women’s College, and fully immerse myself in college and university life. I will take part in several university programs, including becoming a tutor for first year Biology students, teaching learn to swim at the UQ pool and volunteering as a mentor in the UQ Young Scholars Program. In addition, I hope to continue my journey as a scuba diver and learn to surf. I have also been accepted as a volunteer at the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games and am looking forward to the many opportunities and experiences this will afford me.

What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

There have been many times when I have doubted my abilities and have often believed that I was not as intelligent as others around me or did not deserve the same opportunities. During these times, I developed a personal mantra, which I continue to use to this day. In times like these, I will repeat to myself ‘I am enough’.

This serves as a constant reminder to stop comparing myself to others, and instead believe that I am just as strong, capable and worthy, and that I do have the talents and tools to succeed in whatever I choose.

Who have been your most significant woman role models?

My mother is the most resilient, kind-hearted and intelligent woman I know, and she is my most significant role model. She has been through many struggles in her life which I have personally witnessed, and she never fails to surprise me with her strength to overcome. She constantly reminds me that we are not defined by our circumstances, and that we ultimately have the power to choose happiness.

March 2018 Arts and Letters Report

By Jennifer Ann Davies

NCWQ Arts and Letters Adviser

Email from an astronaut…

…I do love it up here.  How I wish you could see this view! When I look down at the earth and see how incredibly beautiful she is, I want to shake some sense into everyone living down there.  If only they could see how small and fragile and very alone the earth is, surrounded by all this cold black space. They’d take much better care of her… p.124 ‘Gravity’ Tess Gerritsen, 1999/2012. www.harpercollins.co.uk

Truly sustainable? Rhetoric or reality?

Many hotel companies track water usage and energy performance in different ways and to varying degrees. Cost effective and innovative alternatives in building design and operations are critical, however, the ‘sustainability’ discussion must start at the beginning of the development process. HOTELS. Wyndham Hotel Group, Jan/Feb 2018. Vol 52, No.1.

Some interesting reading on sustainability, technology, real needs and ethics, including the future and desirability or non-desirability of ‘wearables’; and what guests really want, from an hotel. www.hotelsmag.com

CHINA – Performing Arts and Literature

‘AMBER’ co-created by avant-garde director, Meng JINGHUI  and playwright, Liao YIMEI, this large scale multi-media musical drama premiered in Hong Kong in 2015 and is now in its fourth season. A love story, punctuated with satire, the popular show presents in the Opera Hall, Guangzhou, China.

 

‘THE PRODUCERS’ is a very different performance, adapted from the film by American Mel Brooks. This long running show has received many awards and will be seen by audiences in both Guangzhou and Shenzen

‘The Year of the Dog’ is a funny and profound book by award-winning author and illustrator, Grace LIN. Previously published, a special edition has been released for the New Year celebrations, and includes some information and photos of the author’s childhood. Young readers will be sure to love and treasure this little book for years to come. Little Brown Books for Young Readers

‘Micro Cosmos of Bronze Mirrors in Ancient China’ by Huo HONGWEI, unfolds the ways in which the ancient Chinese used mirrors not only to dress and to decorate their houses, but to send regards to lovers, scare away devils or to be used as tokens of good virtues! Using archaeological discoveries, and ancient literature and images, the author reveals to us a reflection of a delicate world in the mirrors. Sanlian Books

 

The Netherlands – AMSTERDAM

This city of 813,562 people is the official capital of the Netherlands, whilst The Hague is the political capital. Endlessly interesting, with her 165 canals and 1,281 bridges, Amsterdam is packed with history and culture. In 1947, Queen Wilhelmina officially declared the meaning of known values and traits: Heroic, Steadfast and Compassionate, to represent the three moral virtues of Compassion, Resolution and Heroism.

There are more than 50 fascinating museums to explore in Amsterdam, including the world famous Rijksmuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Anne Frank House – then there is the unique exhibition at the Hermitage! This truly exceptional exhibition, showcasing highlights from the spectacular treasures of St Petersburg, includes the most renowned collection of great paintings from the Dutch Golden Age outside the Netherlands.

No less than 63 showpieces from the Russian museum’s collection of Dutch Masters are coming to Amsterdam. The rich selection of works includes six paintings by Rembrandt, Ferdinand Bol, Jan Steen and Frans Hals. A feast of old favourites and new discoveries! nieuwsbrief@hermitage.nl

With 6,800 16th, 17th and 18th century buildings, National Geographic has cited the old town as “…one of Europe’s best preserved, photogenic and intact historical city centres.”

Belgium – BRUSSELS

The Council of Women – rue du Meridien 10 – 1210 Brussels (Belgium)

www.vrouwenraad.be                            www.amazone.be

I received a particularly warm welcome from a number of wonderful women, at Amazone House, the home of a range of international councils, organizations and affiliated Women’s groups, all of whom work hard to maintain the vital aims for which the final goal is “…a gender balance in a multicultural society…..”.  The information I will transmit here has been compiled from a particularly useful overview, mindfully prepared for me by Rita Van Gool, in language English! Rita and Naomi took care of me in the absence of Magda De Meyer, and I am deeply grateful to them for a wide range of information, which I can, in turn, relay to our members in Australia.

Rita cites their affiliates as Dutch-speaking women’s associations with various philosophical and ideological backgrounds, and includes large socio-cultural organizations, small lobby groups, professional associations, political women’s groups, trade union women’s groups and independent associations. The activities of the group are:

  • To inform and to sensitize
  • To debate
  • To lobby

Both Rita and her colleague, Naomi De Bruyne, made very clear that debate with other organizations, authorities, the academic world and a range of lobby groups, through working groups, conferences etc. is vital to view any issue, problem or challenge from many different angles, before determining a position or giving advice.

Additional information will be transmitted to the Management Committee of NCWQ.  Interesting publications have been handed on, for us – most in French and Dutch, but some with sufficient English for us to make sense of them and to realise their value.  I had thought that the funding ‘models’ to facilitate these publications could be of interest to our organization in the future; however, most of the women at Amazone House are paid employees, many with particular projects, so the ‘models’ may not apply after all, but we might keep an open mind on that element of discovery.

Rita has also passed on to us an English copy of her amazingly compiled publication, which had been one of her vital projects, initiated by The European Women’s Lobby. EUROPEAN WOMEN’S LOBBY – Europeen des Femmes – TOGETHER FOR A EUROPE FREE FROM PROSTITUTION.

The European Women’s Lobby has initiated, together with Mouvement du Nid France and Fondation Scelles, the signing of this initiative by over 200 NGO’s from all over Europe and beyond! The signatories of the Brussels’ Call, ask EU Member States to review existing policy and to adopt policies that have acknowledged the key principles underpinning this serious, valuable movement.  The key principles are that:-

  • Prostitution is a form of violence
  • Prostitution is a form of exploitation of inequalities
  • Prostitution is a violation of human dignity
  • Prostitution is a violation of human rights womenlobby.org

 

All publications received will be made available to the Management Committee of NCWQ on my return to Australia, including work with refugees and concerns about the lack of literacy in the first language influencing greater needs.

 

LUXEMBOURG PASSES LANDMARK PROSTITUTION BILL CRIMINALISING CLIENTS by Ilias ROUBANIS: ‘New Europe’ 11-17 Feb 2018: p19

Coincidentally, Luxembourg moved to adopt a bill that criminalises the solicitation of prostitution services from sex workers who are minors or “vulnerable individuals”, on February 7, 2018. www.neweurope.eu

…email to an astronaut

we are working very hard to take care of earth – and the earthlings, called humans.    jenunicorn75@hotmail.com

 

PALAIS DU COUDENBERG

An underground tour discovering the Palace of Charles V.

From the middle ages a castle overlooked Brussels from Coudenberg hill. From the 12th century, this prestigious building was one of the most beautiful palaces of Europe and one of Charles V’s main residences.

Severely damaged by fire in 1731, the remains of this palace make up the Coudenberg archaeological site.

The underground tour of discovery reveals the old structures which are now the foundations of today’s Royal Quarter.

Magnificent paintings, artefacts and personal belongings of former royalty may be viewed by the public.

www.coudenberg.brussels                        info@coudenberg.brussels

 

BELVUE MUSEUM – Belgium is surprising!

Democracy, prosperity, solidarity, pluralism, migration, language and Europe! These are the themes used by the museum to help people discover Belgium. Each theme is developed through present-day testimonials and then traced right through history. This is a modern, original way of gaining a fuller understanding of modern-day Belgium.

…a lithograph by Magritte

Crystal vases by Val Saint-Lambert

…a carnival costume from Binche – and –

A football signed by the Red Devils!!

www.belvue.be

info@belvue.be

 

ELLES TOURNENT – 4 x days of films especially for Women!

Realises par des femmes!   Gemaakt door Vrouwen!

A wonderful meeting with the vivacious Nele Pigeon, who has also then ‘introduced’ me, via email, to some of her colleagues, all of whom await further information on our Australian female directors and Australian film!

The stunning feature of the four days of film is that EVERY film is made by a Woman!  A wide variety exists thematically, culturally and emotionally, and I am going to give you the film names and a very brief English synopsis on many – because I feel this is an amazingly important initiative and also because it may be possible that some of us might be able to access the films via Dendy or World Films.

  • Lipstick Under My Burkha – India – Alankrita Shrivastava 2016

Under each burkha there’s a woman who desperately wants to live! Four Indian women claim their desire for freedom and sexuality by showing acts of courage.

  • Maman Non Merci – Canada – Magenta Baribeau 2015

When choosing not to have children is a daily struggle, a resistance to social pressure. Refreshing.

  • Please Remember Me – China – Peng Xiaolian 2016

A romance in the squats of Shanghai. Old Chinese cinema stars as inspiration for today’s youth.

  • Siberian Love – Russia – Olga Delane 2016

After living in Berlin for 20 years, Olga Delane returns to her family in Siberia, where relationships are traditional and practical….but what about love? A tender quest for love in rural Siberia.

  • Les Filles – Iran – Fery Malek 2017

What are the dreams of today’s Iranian girls? An Iranian female society breaking all the stereotypes.

  • Los Ninos (L’Ecole de la Vie) – Chile – Maite Alberdi 2016

Anita, Rita, Ricardo and Andre just want to live like grown-ups. The trouble is that they are over 40, with Down’s syndrome and still in school!

  • Tamara Y La Catarina (Tamara and the Ladybug) – Mexico – Lucia Carreras 2016

The fragile Tamara finds a baby on the street…Honest and captivating meeting of three generations of women united in solidarity in Mexico.

  • Hooligan Sparrow – USA – Nanfu Wang 2016 (outstanding)

The Chinese feminist activist Hooligan Sparrow is not afraid of becoming an enemy of the State. She will continue the fight for women’s rights.

 

I will list more of these women’s films in my next report.

 

France – PARIS

MARIE CURIE – une femme au PANTHEON

2017 marked the 150th anniversary of the greatest scientist of the 20th century, Marie Curie. For this occasion, the national centre of monuments and the Musee Curie offered an unprecedented exhibition at the Pantheon, from November 8 2017 through to March 4 2018, entitled: MARIE CURIE: une femme au Pantheon.

Through this exhibition, the general public will discover elements behind the scenes of the scientific work and also the private life of Marie Curie. Rich archives, scientific instruments, period documents and personal effects are presented in an original layout in the heart of the Northern transcept and transcribe Marie Curie’s familial and scientific universes. www.paris-pantheon.fr

 

 Paris is uniquely herself! Very beautiful, singularly interesting, sometimes chaotic, often very wet and cold, full of wonderful histories, art and the ever-famous Louvre and Musee d’Orsay!

Musees de la Ville de Paris offer new sights and insights for lovers of art, history and literature! One can explore:

  • Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
  • Maison de Balzac
  • Musee Bourdelle
  • Musee Carnavalet – Histoire de Paris
  • Catacombes de Paris
  • Crypte Archeologique de L’Ile de la Citie
  • Musee Cernuschi: Musee des Arts de L’Asie de la Villa de Paris
  • Musee Cognacq-Jay: Le /Gout du XVIII
  • Palais Galliera: Musee de la Mode de la Ville de Paris
  • Musee du General Leclerc de Hauteclocque et de la Liberation de Paris Musee Jean Moulin
  • Petit Palais: Musee des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris *
  • Maison de Victor Hugo a Paris: L’hotel de Rohan-Guemenee
  • Musee de la Vie Romantique
  • Musee Zadkine parismusees.paris.fr

 

Paris – February 2018 – Hiver!

It is cold! I had already written about some of the Dutch Masters and travelling exhibitions. Yet another opportunity presents itself –

DUTCH ARTISTS IN PARIS (1789-1914)

Van Gogh, Van Dongen, Mondrian and others…

The Petit Palace currently presents Dutch Artists in Paris *

an exhibition focusing on the wealth of artistic, aesthetic and amical exchange between Dutch and French painters in Paris, from the end of the eighteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth.

The display of one hundred and fifteen works, tells the story of the links between Dutch artists and their French counterparts, which channelled influences, interchange and mutual enrichment. The nine representative Dutch artists are:-            Gerard van Spaendonck, Ary Scheffer, Jacob Maris, Johan Jongkind, Fredrick Kaemmerer, George Breitner, Vincent van Gogh, Kees van Dongen and Piet Mondrian. Their works are presented next to those of contemporary French artists such as:- Gericault, David, Corot, Millet, Boudin, Monet, Cezanne, Signac, Braque and Picasso. www.petitpalais.paris.fr

LA MUSIQUE!

 Come and visit us! The Musee of Music offers young and old the chance to discover more than 1,000 instruments and art objects. This unique, world-class collection includes national treasures and legendary instruments, including a piano belonging to Chopin. Every day, a musician brings the Music collection to life by playing music and talking about an instrument or repertoire. (French/English/Spanish). Porte de Pantin.  Live and recorded concerts are free. www.live.philharmoniedeparis.fr

IWD 2018: Carly Dyer, NCWQ Bursary Recipient

To mark 2018 International Women’s Day, NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in the lead up to the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Carly Dyer shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month or two.  

What were the benefits to you in being a 2017 NCWQ bursary recipient?

Receiving a 2017 NCWQ bursary, along with some other funding I received from QUT, enabled me to take a trip of a lifetime to Paris, France to present my research at an international conference and attend an amazing 3 week course in one of the world’s finest research institutes. Taking this trip was a landmark for me both professionally and personally. Firstly, having been temporarily relieved of the wonderful but crazy demands of daily life raising a young family, it gave me a much-needed chance to work on my doctoral thesis at a crucial stage in its development. Secondly, it gave me a chance to be inspired (how can you not be inspired in Paris?!) and reminded of the reasons I am pursuing a PhD in women’s health studies at this time.

What are your goals for this year?

I will finish my final research project and submit my thesis this year. Once that’s done, I will pursue new opportunities that come my way for further research and development to improve healthcare services we offer women in Australia and all over the world.

What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

Choose your pursuits wisely, then pursue excellence in everything you do.

Who have been your most significant woman role models?

Dr. Catherine Hamlin and my grandmother, Shirley George, are both devoted women who inspire me greatly. My grandmother has shown dogged determination to live her life well despite difficult circumstances growing up and many health challenges she’s faced over the years. She taught my mother and now me, the honour of being devoted to your family, to serve them, to spend time with them, and to bless them in every way you can. Dr. Hamlin has devoted more than 50 years of her life to restoring Ethiopian women’s health and lives through her hospital, which provides free obstetric fistula surgery. The sacrifice and commitment she has made through her life’s work to empower women to live healthy, happy lives is an inspiration to me and my life’s work.

IWD 2018: Bronwyn Duncan, NCWQ Bursary Recipient

To mark 2018 International Women’s Day, NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in the lead up to the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Bronwyn Duncan shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month or two.  

What were the benefits to you in being a 2017 NCWQ bursary recipient?

This award gave me a lot of confidence in myself. I felt for the first time like I was on the right path and it helped me to confirm that whilst I am pursuing a non-traditional field, I am doing well. It has opened my eyes to the incredible work done by women, often behind the scenes, and has made me aware of the role models that I have surrounding me. I have been able to save the money from the award to put towards travelling to Singapore for exchange, where I will be spending 6 months at the National University of Singapore. It has given me the confidence to pursue this adventure in my studies.

What are your goals for this year?

This year I have several key goals:

  • Attend the National University of Singapore for Semester 2, 2018. During this I aim to participate in both volunteering and an internship position, and to get a taste of the research field
  • I am the student’s logistics manager for the 2018 Brisbane spark engineering camp, and I aim through this role to inspire students with an educational disadvantage to push the boundaries of what they thought was possible, and to encourage them to pursue tertiary education. In particular, I want to focus on obtaining a higher percentage of female students, and encouraging more of them to apply to the camp
  • Continue working with Robogals in running robotics to inspire young women into STEM as well as advancing my own skills with robotics through my work with Somerville House as a robotics coach

What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

I am a very goal driven person and love a challenge, so I will break by aspirations down into manageable steps. I love the quote “Life’s for the living, so live it, or you’re better off dead”, because it pushes me to live every moment that I can along the way. I also often use the tact of “who said I can’t? What’s in the way stopping me?” and I often like the drive of proving that I can, no matter what anyone says.

Who have been your most significant woman role models?

I always looked up to Marie Curie, who pushed the boundaries of science, and was the only person to ever receive two Nobel prizes. Another significant role model is Emma Watson, who has been very public about equality and rights. She has always stood tall and confident which is inspiring. More recently, I have developed role models within my life. My most significant role model is one of my physics tutors Sam, who inspired me by spending the time to help me understand what I was doing and building my confidence in the field, but also by being so passionate about her research. She has helped provide me with guidance along the way as well.

IWD 2018: Anneliese McConnell, NCWQ Bursary Recipient

To mark 2018 International Women’s Day, NCWQ is profiling an impressive women each day in the lead up to the 8th March. These featured young women are past NCWQ Bursary Recipients, and have demonstrated incredible leadership, success, community service, intelligence and commitment to their personal and professional passions. In today’s feature, past bursary recipient Anneliese McConnell shares her thoughts.

To learn more about the bursary program, keep an eye on our website in the coming month or two.  

What were the benefits to you in being a 2017 NCWQ bursary recipient?

Receiving the bursary allowed me to enrich my study opportunities in the year, and will continue to throughout my degree.

What are your goals for this year?

I would like to maintain a high academic standard, but also would like to be able to take time to enjoy myself and really make the most of my time spent at uni. This year, I would like to become even more involved in all aspects of the university life and throw myself into it all as much as possible. However,  I would also love to be able to make time for my other passion, which is music. I want 2018 to be a year of creation. I think having that kind of balance and always staying creative makes me happier, keeps my mind active, and makes it easier to achieve any academic goals I may have.

What is your personal mantra or self-talk that you use to keep yourself on track in pursuing your aspirations?

Wherever possible, I like to say yes to any opportunity that comes my way.

Who have been your most significant woman role models?

My most significant role model is definitely my mum. She has always shown such immense strength in the face of adversity, and inspires me every single day.